WISE UP 2017

Together We Grow in Knowledge

Annual Wise Up 2017

Welcome to the WISE UP conference.

It is with great pleasure that I invite you to the 2017 WISE UP conference to be held at the Pacific Events Centre in Manukau on the 11th & 12th October.

Our theme for 2017 is “Together we grow in knowledge”. Such a fundamental notion to how we as social practitioners interact to support children and young people in schools. We explore the value and influence that our social & youth work roles have in building stronger, supportive and secure learning communities.

Opportunities to network and share new knowledge together will evoke pivotal practice discussions that will shape how we better respond to the future generations.

So on behalf of the amazing and dedicated team of managers across Auckland SWIS, Massis & YWiSS providers, we encourage you to lock this event into your calendars and register now! You will not be disappointed.

Judy Matai’a
Chief Executive
ATWC

Conference Starts in:

Why Attend WISE UP 2017

This year we have Pio Terei (from Building Awesome Whanau) as our conference MC.

The conference is an excellent opportunity for continued and relevant professional development within the sector of social workers and youth workers engaged within schools. Professional networking is a highlight as we get to connect with SWiS colleagues from across the country working in the same field.

In an era where children and young people are being bombarded with information at their fingertips, we need to be purposeful and deliberate with how we as practitioners respond to their needs. Research suggests the role of school social workers is needing to respond to far more multi-dimensional issues as well as react to the contemporary challenges facing schools.

Attending this conference will equip you with knowledge and skills to identify, understand and address the challenges.

Survey results from last year’s WiSE UP conference tells us that:

    72% of delegates felt it exceeded expectations of conference serving the purpose of attending
    73% of delegates felt it exceeded expectations for the quality of speaker
    73% of delegates felt it exceeded expectations for learning new things
    68% of delegates felt it exceeded expectations that questions they had were answered

Quality Time with Experts

We have set this year’s theme as “together we grow in knowledge” with subthemes of:

    Inclusion, integration and transformation
    Trauma Informed Practice
    Building resilience (within the workforce and for the young people we work with)
    Transformative practice
    Abstracts from professionals and academics are being viewed and will be posted in August.

Here is a sampling of workshops that were held last year:

    Suicide prevention: Pasifika for Life
    Spirituality as a protective factor in suicide
    Power of peer supervision
    Advocating for children, domestic violence and a voice for children
    Social work and child protection in schools: exploring challenges and opportunities
    Cyber bullying and the law

Who Should Attend?

Social workers / youth workers who work predominantly in the education sector along with other professionals who may find it helpful looking through a social work lens.

Early Bird tickets are $316.25. Tickets close on the 15th August 2017

Register your interest and we will contact you with the registration form.

SPEAKERS & SCHEDULE

OPENING ADDRESS

Hoani Jeremy Lambert
Tamariki Advocate, Deputy Chief Executive, Voices of Children at Oranga Tamariki
The Ministry for Vulnerable Children

View Profile
Jeremy (Ngati Kahungunu ki Wairoa) recently joined Oranga Tamariki as the DCE Voices of Children, Tamariki Advocate. In this role, Jeremy is responsible for:

  1. ensuring the voices of  children and young people are heard in all strategy, design and policy processes and are represented in the leadership group.
  2. holding the primary relationship with the Office of the Children’s Commissioner and with the independent advocacy group for care experienced children and young people, VOYCE
  3. providing service design including operational policy
  4. engaging New Zealanders in the mission of keeping children safe and improving their well being

Jeremy came to Oranga Tamariki from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT) where he was working as a Diplomat in their Asia and Americas group. He joined MFAT as the head of communications and led whole-of-government international communications responses to issues such as Botulism scare (2013) and the 1080 blackmail threat to poison infant milk powder in 2014.

Prior to his time at MFAT, Jeremy worked in a series of directors roles at the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF) leading their communications, strategy and cargo operations functions. While at MAF, he completed an Executive Masters in Public Administration from the Australia and New Zealand School of Government.

As well we extensive public sector experience, Jeremy is a skilled advocate having successfully lobbied for social justice and health reforms on behalf of New Zealand’s LGBTIQ communities. He is a former chair of the New Zealand AIDS Foundation.

Jeremy co-parents four year old Molly-Mae with his partner and, two mums.

KEYNOTE

DAY 1 THEATRE – PM – Emma Rawson

Dissonance – Private School, Ponies and Poi

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Emma Rawson

Emma will be speaking about her journey as a child, a young Māori woman, a young Māori leader and the challenges of identity and responsibility tempered by the realities of humanity and everyday expectation. This will be a chance to reflect on the diversity of the Māori experience, and the challenges to and definition of Māori success.

Emma is Ngāti Ranginui, Ngai Te Rangi and Raukawa. Passionate about public health and community development Emma has a wide range of professional experience including over 14 years in Māori Health, Public Health, Health Promotion and consulting on Māori responsiveness.

Emma holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Māori from the University of Canterbury, a Post- Graduate Certificate in Public Health from the University of Otago and is currently undertaking her Masters of Philosophy in Public Health at AUT. Emma is a graduate of the Leadership Programme for Māori in Public Health and a core member of the Māori Graduate Alumni group. In 2016 Emma was awarded the inaugural Pae Tawhiti Masters Scholarship from the Whakauae Research Centre. Her Masters of Philosophy topic is ‘Institutional Racism in Public Health Units’. Emma was also a recipient of the 2015/16 Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences summer studentship at AUT.

Emma has presented at a number of international conferences on her work in psychosocial social marketing, Post earthquake Māori responses, resilience, Māori health promotion and work on addressing institutional racism.

Emma is a core member of the special interest group on institutional racism for the Public Health Association of New Zealand alongside some of this country’s leading Public Health practitioners and academics.

 

DAY 2 THEATRE – AM – Dr. Liz Beddoe

Future proofing social work in a turbulent era: The challenges ahead

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Future proofing social work in a turbulent era: The challenges ahead

By the time this talk is delivered we will have a new government and our profession will be facing the task of engaging with a new minister, regardless of the outcome of the election. The changes begun by the present minister are underway but a new minister will want to put their own stamp on social welfare policy. The area of focus will inevitably be on child welfare, but the role of non-statutory social work is likely to gain more prominence. We will also be contributing to the debates about the development of the new social worker registration legislation.

I will delineate some of the big challenges ahead for social work in Aotearoa New Zealand. I will also suggest some ideas for the development of a strategic social work manifesto to improve our opportunities and resources.

Liz Beddoe is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Auckland in New Zealand. Liz practiced social work for 14 years in health settings. Liz’s teaching and research interests include critical perspectives on social work education, supervision and professional identity. Liz has published articles in New Zealand and international journals addressing supervision and professional issues including the professional experiences of migrant social workers. She is Editor-in-chief of the open access journal Aotearoa New Zealand Social Work.

Liz has co-authored two books on supervision with Allyson Davys: ‘Best Practice in Professional Supervision: A Guide for the Helping Professions’ (2010, Jessica Kingsley Publishers) and ‘Challenges in professional supervision: Current themes and models for practice’ (2016, Jessica Kingsley Publishers). Liz has also co-edited ‘Supervision in Social Work: Contemporary Issues’ (2015, Routledge) with Jane Maidment. She has also co-edited ‘Promoting Health and Wellbeing in Social Work Education’ (Routledge, 2013) with Beth Crisp, ‘Social Work Practice for Promoting Health and Wellbeing: Critical Issues’ with Jane Maidment (Routledge, 2014) and ‘Social Policy for Social Work and Human Services in Aotearoa New Zealand: Diverse Perspectives’ with Jane Maidment (Canterbury University Press, 2016).

 

DAY 2 THEATRE – PM – Ksenija Napan

Growing Free People

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This presentation will explore what conditions precede addictive behaviour and how can social workers create contexts where addictive behaviours have no appeal. A novel and slightly controversial view on addictions will be presented and critically reflected upon. Links between sustainability, spirituality and social justice will be drawn with a special emphasis on enriching education with indigenous wisdom, development of healthy relationships and enabling children and young people to communicate and explore existential questions that they find relevant for their present and future. This presentation will draw on Klaus Bosselman’s, Gabor Mate’s and Daniel Sumrok’s research and will integrate their findings into a specific way of practising social work in schools in order to support young people to discover how can they live fulfilled lives where addiction has no space to grow.

Ksenija Napan is an associate professor at Massey University in Aotearoa New Zealand. Her main research interests are in inquiry and ‘whole people’ learning. She developed two teaching methods based on principles of cooperative and dialogic teaching and learning for beginning and advanced social workers which are applicable in a range of other disciplines. Ksenija is a curious scholar who values social justice, academic relevance, sustainability and kaitiakitanga expressed in a context of collaborative and respectful relationships. Her passion is in the integration of seemingly opposing polarities like research and practice, science and spirituality, internal and external, tertiary education and fun, individual and communal, fear of change and love for transformation, sustainability and transformation of unsustainable political systems. Ksenija is interested in intercultural communication, inquiry and collaborative learning.

All her academic working life she has been focused on continuous improvement of educational processes and is a Senior Faculty member of the William Glasser Institute and Interuniversity Centre in Dubrovnik . Her passion lies in the development of courses, programmes and academic institutions through engagement with communities, inquiry and research.

DAY ONE

TORU ROOM – AM – Rita Riccola

Mindfulness for Resilience and Mental Health

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‘ We ask our students pay attention all day long yet we never teach them how.”

 Amy Saltzman

Rita Riccola worked as a high school teacher for many years before introducing Mindful NZ Schools training in 2012. She has practiced mindfulness for 27 years and feels a social obligation to share with as many receptive educators and social workers as possible. Rita believes mindfulness training should be part of the NZ curriculum as attention training is the foundation of all learning.

Mindful NZ Schools has been offering training programmes for students and teachers for the past 5 years.  Mindfulness practices have been extensively researched and the consistent results from daily practice are:

  • improved attention and focus
  • decreased stress and anxiety
  • increased social and emotional intelligence
  • improved executive function
  • better sleep quality

 

TAHI ROOM – AM – Sarah Finlay-Robinson
Avoiding run-ins on the street and other tips: Looking at youth issues differently

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As youth workers we build quality relationships with young people paying attention to their uniqueness and working on building their strengths; We consider their gifts and talents, their whakapapa, their family/whanau, their peers, school, and inner worlds. But what are the other factors that influence their development and life stories? What is the role of community, society and global forces in young people’s development? This interactive workshop will take you on an exploration of social approaches working with young people. You will be challenged to consider how you consider the bigger picture in your work with young people.

Sarah Finlay-Robinson is a lecturer at WelTec on the Bachelor of Youth Development, The only dedicate youth development degree in Aotearoa. Born in the Waikato, Sarah has called Auckland home for the last fifteen years. Sarah has had fifteen years working as a professional youth worker after years of volunteer youth work experience in her local community. She is an experienced youth development and community development practitioner, with a particular passion for youth participation and social justice and programme design. As a teacher of youth development, Sarah is passionate about developing skilled youth workers whose practice that makes a real difference for young people and communities.

 

RUA ROOM – AM – Yvette Spencer-Dunn & Renee Annan
BodySafe – Talking about sexual violence with young people in a safe and open space

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The BodySafe programme is designed to create conversations with young people about consent, sex, respectful relationships and preventing sexual violence. We create a safe and open culture where for young people to talk about sexual violence and also cultivate knowledge and skills to develop respectful relationships.

Young people are able to ask questions around relationships and sexual violence and also engage in conversations that help debunk myths and develop soft skills that promote respectful and positive sexual relating.

BodySafe is designed to be inclusive and trauma informed and acknowledges the innate resiliency and resourcefulness of young people.

Rape Prevention Education Whakatu Mauri has been working in Auckland secondary schools for the past 15 years. RPE’s BodySafe programme has been developed specifically for young people in order to promote healthy, respectful relationships and prevent experiences of sexual harm or violence. RPE delivers over 400 BodySafe workshops a year to more than 2500 diverse young people across the Auckland area.

Yvette Spencer-Dunn

Yvette is one of our senior educators and has delivered over 500 workshops to more than 2000 participants. Yvette has experience in working with young people in high schools, alternative education centers and teen parent units and also delivers workshop to professionals as part of their professional development. Outside of the work she does for RPE, Yvette loves exercising, spending time with friends and whanau and is a cat person.

 

 

Renee Annan 

Renee loves to dance, cook, travel around Aotearoa New Zealand and the world. She is from Waitakere and has a background in fundraising, coordinating and campaigning for local community organizations. Renee is passionate that young people deserve good information and shame-free education about sexual health and sexuality. She is a strong advocate for Tiriti relationships in movements for social change and believes that action towards violence-free communities must be addressed from a holistic perspective.

 

WHA ROOM – AM – Liz Wilkinson

Impact of Trauma on Children

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This workshop will focus on the impact of trauma on children—in relationships and in school etc—it will have attachment underlying the discussion along with the serious neuroscience of trauma.  As a child psychotherapist, Liz is passionate about ‘attachment’, or the development of safe, nurturing relationships for all children. Lack of a secure relationship has profound effects on lifelong emotional health. We all have experienced the ‘persona’ who has missed out: need for power and control, marked vigilance, poor emotional regulation, marked stress response leading to an overactive ‘flight or fight or freeze’ response, etc. These children are unavailable for learning and healthy relationships without lots of support.

Liz Wilkinson was a pediatrician in her homeland of Canada and on moving to New Zealand she retrained as a child psychotherapist. She works part-time at ATWC working predominately with children who have experienced trauma.

 

RUA ROOM – PM – Aulola Fuka-Lino
Heilala Malu – A Tongan Suicide Prevention Framework

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Social pressures such as lack of resources, poverty, relationship breakdown, increase in alcohol and drug use, overcrowding, accommodation, poor education and cultural expectations are risk factors to suicide in Aotearoa, New Zealand.

Focusing on the Tongan community, intergenerational expectations have significant strain on the psychological distress experienced by family’s specifically young people. This psychological distress sometimes leads young people to think suicide is the only option. Recognizing and knowing how to address such sensitive issues is key. But more importantly, opening up the opportunity for dialogue and sourcing relevant support is important.

The Heilala Malu framework provides cultural considerations and offers an ethnic-specific suicide prevention approach to those at risk to suicide.

 

WHA ROOM – PM – Rosemine Mutamuliza, Dawit Arshak and Celia Brandon
Workshop: Through our eyes – practice issues and engagement with children and families from refugee backgrounds

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This workshop will invite you into a perspective of some matters to consider whilst engaging with families from a Refugee background. Moving is hard for anyone but former refugees often need extra support. The Refugee Experience is diverse, they are ordinary people experiencing extraordinary circumstances most of the families are incredibly resilient. You will hear a first account refugee journey story.

We will touch on the different refugee categories in New Zealand, the support provided by the NZ Red Cross. Together we will explore ways to engage with culturally and linguistically diverse former refugee communities and the available resources to begin breaking barriers to access services.

 

Rosemine N. Mutamuliza BSocP, RSW She is a native of Rwanda and citizen of New Zealand, arriving in 1999 as a refugee. She has extensive knowledge in the refugee resettlement sector. Rosemine graduated with a Bachelor of Social Practice majoring in Community Development. Currently works for New Zealand Read Cross as the Humanitarian Services Coordinator. Rosemine strives for social justice and the right for all people to have equity of access to services.

 

 

 

Dawit Arshak is from Ethiopia, came to NZ as a refugee in 1998 and is married with 5 AfroKiwi children. Dawit regularly gives voice to the experience of refugee parents and their children and offers to respond to any questions asked. Since 2005 Dawit has been working in the refugee sector; currently working for NZ Red Cross as Resettlement Case Worker and Cultural advisor.

 

 

 

Celia Brandon is Client Services Team Leader in Auckland. Her work is responsible for the oversight of settlement support in Auckland region. Celia is a Registered Social Worker with a Masters of Arts (applied) in Social Work from Victoria University (New Zealand) and has 21 years post qualifying experience both within New Zealand and the United Kingdom.  She has worked in various social work positions including paediatrics, older people, disability, drug and alcohol and mental health. In her work in London with asylum seekers/refugees she developed a passion for work within the refugee sector which she pursued on her return in 2004. She has since worked in refugee resettlement with NZ Red Cross Refugee Programmes (formerly RMS/Refugee Services).

 

TORU ROOM – PM – Sarah Finlay-Robinson
Can you pull off these kicks? An empathetic look at how young people have a voice in their families, schools and communities

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This workshop puts you in the shoes of a young person trying to have a voice in decision-making. We’ll unpack the dynamics of empathy and power in youth participation. You’ll discover the barriers and supports for youth participation, and the tensions for youth work practice. The UNCRC talks about youth participation as the right for young people to have a voice and influence in decision-making within their family, school or community. We’ll examine what the essential elements for good youth participation are, and what the right for young people to be heard means in practice.

Sarah Finlay-Robinson is a lecturer at WelTec on the Bachelor of Youth Development, The only dedicate youth development degree in Aotearoa. Born in the Waikato, Sarah has called Auckland home for the last fifteen years. Sarah has had fifteen years working as a professional youth worker after years of volunteer youth work experience in her local community. She is an experienced youth development and community development practitioner, with a particular passion for youth participation and social justice and programme design. As a teacher of youth development, Sarah is passionate about developing skilled youth workers whose practice that makes a real difference for young people and communities.

 

TAHI ROOM – PM – Irene de Hann
Watching and waiting and the SWiS role

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Watchful waiting and the SWiS role, as described by school principals with concerns about child maltreatment

As part of a recent New Zealand research study of teachers’ understanding of child maltreatment, school principals were asked to describe how concerns about maltreatment are managed within their schools. Reporting the concern to statutory authorities (CYF at the time) was sometimes delayed while the school called upon their SWiS to work with the family and the teacher observed the child. Reasons for delayed reporting included fear – of being wrong, of disrupting an established relationship with the family, or of retribution by the family. Principals noted sympathy for families whose struggles were known to the school. Some doubted CYF’s capacity to respond effectively, citing CYF workload issues and high thresholds. Principals found themselves ‘worrying about what might happen to the children and worrying that what CYF do causes something worse’. The SWiS role is crucial in ensuring the well-being of children and families in very difficult circumstances.

Irene de Haan teaches social work at the University of Auckland. For 15 years she was manager of Homebuilders Family Services in Warkworth, a non-profit sector organisation providing home-based social work support, advocacy and counselling for children and young people. She also has worked as a Senior Advisor in the Office of the Chief Social Worker, where she undertook research projects and reviews of child deaths and other significant events. She currently chairs regional family violence death review panels under the auspices of the Health, Quality and Safety Commission.

 

PM – Min Vette

Future SWiStics

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The workshop called ‘Future SWiStics’ will cover:

    • Summary of SDQ Survey
    • SDQ reporting (provider returns)
    • Preliminary results of the SWiS Expansion evaluation
    • Conversations about the Future possibilities for SWiS

DAY TWO

TORU ROOM – AM – Barbara Gilray

Whaia te Pai: achieving excellence

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Barbara Gilray

TOGETHER WE GROW IN KNOWLEDGE: “Whaia te pai – achieving excellence”

Practising social work is complex – there is nothing easy about it.

Modern social work is more than just “doing” or “common sense” – increasingly it involves practitioners needing to be resilient, informed, adaptive, knowledge based, culturally competent , connected, reflective, humanistic, challenged and engaged.

“In our increasingly complex world, competent social work practitioners are required to have an enormous kete of expertise” (Gilray 2013 pg33). We can only be “excellent” in our social work profession by being the best practitioners that we can possibly be.

This presentation will give an informative, easily understood look at the changes to legislation, it will look at how mandatory registration might affect the social work profession, and discuss how registration can improve the professionalism and accountability of social workers.

Registration ensures that the public are properly protected, and social workers are competent to practise, and accountable for the way in which they practise social work.

Reference:

Gilray, B (2013).Social worker registration: A decade of development, debate and delivery. Aotearoa New Zealand Social Work Review XXV, (3)25-34.

 

WHA ROOM – AM – Jonathan Selu
Rainbow Communities: Making the Connection

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You’re in your office and a young person walks through the door and sits down. During the course of your assessment, you find out that they identify as a pansexual, non-binary person and request that you use gender neutral pronouns. What do you do? If your initial reaction is confusion or panic, you’re probably not alone. In recent years, LGBTI issues have become a lot more visible in the mainstream social discourse. As social workers working with young people, it is vital that we have an awareness of what it means to be an LGBTI young person in 21st century New Zealand. This workshop will focus on practical skills that social workers can use in their daily practice to ensure safer environments for LGBTI people.

Jonathan Selu is of Samoan and European heritage, born and bred in West Auckland. They are an LGBTI social activist with a particular interest in intersectionality and identity formation. Jonathan has a background in health promotion and education, specialising in sexual health, sexual violence prevention, sexuality and gender identity, mental health, and decolonisation. Currently, Jonathan is completing their Masters of Applied Social Work through Massey University and contracting as a private consultant.

 

TAHI ROOM – AM – Paul Watkin
Every whanau has a story, what’s yours?

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Every Whanau Has A Story, What’s Yours?

The aim of this workshop is to teach practitioners Whiti Whiti Korero – the Art of Spiral Discourse. Practitioners will be taught how to conflate and ideate questions based on Whanau Themes

# Warning this is an interactive workshop – it could cause changes that will enhance and challenge your practice.

The essence of Biculturalism, is that we grow in each others strengths. “ Every Whanau Has A Story, What’s Yours?” is an indigenous tool to assist the practitioner to be able to engage, assess and plan with Tamariki and their Whanau, by applying Whiti Whiti Korero – The Art of Spiral Discourse.

This tool will resonate, reciprocate and rejuvenate your practice to ensure you give back Mana rather than take Mana from the Tamariki and their Whanau we are privileged to serve.

Paul Watkin

Originally from a small island west of here, known as “STRAYA”, I am part of the convict exchange programme for social workers between Aussie and Aotearoa NZ.

After 28 years working in a variety of social services of Aotearoa, I am yet to have received a letter from the Australian Government to ask me to return to my homeland, “ What’s that about ?” I am currently employed as a Team Leader for Family Works, for 17 SWiS in the South Auckland area, which keeps me on my toes for most days of the week. I see myself as a PRACADEMIC, part practitioner, part academic. I enjoy creating indigenous resources that stimulate and provoke practice that is mana enhancing for the clients we engage with. This workshop will inspire and encourage your inner creativity to emerge.

 

RUA ROOM – AM – Ruth Uo
Village Collective

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‘E fofo e le alamea le alamea’ – Solutions for issues within a community can be found within the community

The Village Collective (previously The Family Life Education Pasefika Trust) deliver comprehensive sexuality education in schools across Auckland. They are no strangers to taboo topics many of our community members/families are willing to avoid. The Village Collective deliver a programme called Mates and Dates in high schools. This programme was designed for students from year 9 through to year 13 (NCEA accredited) and was specifically developed to prevent dating and sexual violence. It is an interactive programme that facilitates discussions that many of our young people/parents/whanau are not prepared to have but have highlighted the desperate need for direction. The sensitive nature around the subject has made it difficult to have open talanoa, leading young people to rely on other sources of information – which are more likely than not, unreliable and unsafe.

Whether is it answering questions from young people regarding their own sexual health (Puberty – physical and emotional changes) to friendships/relationships (what is a healthy relationship? What is consent?) the Village Collective acknowledges the tremendous need for support in this area and are willing to help.

Ruth Uo is of Samoan decent, born in New Zealand and raised in South Auckland. Her passion to serve the community/young people comes from a strong link to her faith in God and a solid foundation; her father – a Pastor in local church and mother a community health worker in south Auckland for several years. Ruth completed her studies at the University of Auckland majoring in Social Science for Public Health with a background in Health Science, Health Promotion and Pacific Nutrition. She is also an experienced facilitator and programme coordinator for the trust. Ruth has nine years’ experience in the health sector, working in Pacific and mainstream services such as the Heart Foundation with a role as Health Promotion Coordinator for the South Auckland area, and now as one of the dynamic Team Leaders for the Village Collective.

 

TORU ROOM – PM – Analosa Veukiso-Ulugia
SSSH! Students, Silence and Sexual Health

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During adolescence young people experience rapid physical, mental and emotional changes. ‘Sex’ and sexuality are key issues that youth grapple with. As social workers, working respectfully with diversity and difference are central to our practice. In addition, we are encouraged to incorporate indigenous knowledge into our practice. However, ‘sex’ and sexuality is briefly covered in our training.

While schools are where most students learn about sexual health, for many young Pacific students ‘sex’ is a sensitive and taboo topic. This presentation highlights key factors that influence the sexual health knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours of Samoan Youth in Aotearoa New Zealand. This information is drawn from a mixed-methods study that included a survey with 535 Samoan students across New Zealand, interviews with eight key informants and eight focus groups with 55 Auckland Samoan secondary students. This presentation explores how we as social workers can integrate such research knowledge into our practice.

Analosa Veukiso-Ulugia currently lectures in the School of Counselling, Human Services and Social Work at the University of Auckland. She has worked in clinical, research, tertiary education and community settings. As a former adolescent health social worker for Counties Manukau District Health Board (CMH) she has worked predominantly with Pacific youth and their families that experience chronic and complex health issues. She has also provided support for students in Alternative Education schools. She has also worked for Child, Youth and Family (Oranga Tamariki) in Care and Protection and Youth Justice. Analosa’s research interests include Pacific health, adolescent development and Pacific mental health. Her PhD study explores factors that influence the sexual health attitudes, knowledge and behaviour of Sāmoan youth in Aotearoa New Zealand.

 

Theatre – PM – Ksenija Napan
Connect, explore, grow

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Connect, explore, grow

This workshop will use a specific process to explore critical issues school social workers face in their practice. Bring one issue, problem or challenge and through a simple peer method that is going to be demonstrated, your colleagues will help you to develop a novel perspective or strategies to resolve it.

Ksenija Napan is an associate professor at Massey University in Aotearoa New Zealand. Her main research interests are in inquiry and ‘whole people’ learning. She developed two teaching methods based on principles of cooperative and dialogic teaching and learning for beginning and advanced social workers which are applicable in a range of other disciplines. Ksenija is a curious scholar who values social justice, academic relevance, sustainability and kaitiakitanga expressed in a context of collaborative and respectful relationships. Her passion is in the integration of seemingly opposing polarities like research and practice, science and spirituality, internal and external, tertiary education and fun, individual and communal, fear of change and love for transformation, sustainability and transformation of unsustainable political systems. Ksenija is interested in intercultural communication, inquiry and collaborative learning. All her academic working life she has been focused on continuous improvement of educational processes and is a Senior Faculty member of the William Glasser Institute and Interuniversity Centre in Dubrovnik . Her passion lies in the development of courses, programmes and academic institutions through engagement with communities, inquiry and research.

 

Rua ROOM – PM – Liz Beddoe
If You Could Change Two Things

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Given legislative changes to child welfare systems in Aotearoa New Zealand it was deemed timely to examine the challenges faced by SWiS and schools in responding to child abuse and neglect (CAN). A qualitative study of school professionals’ responses to CAN included 20 semi-structured interviews with school-based social workers. When SWiS were asked to state two things that would improve in schools’ responses to CAN four main themes were identified: improved training on CAN for school staff; better support for teachers; a more holistic approach to child wellbeing, and improved understanding and relationship with the statutory child protection. SWiS recognised the demands on classroom teachers and the limits of their ability to respond to concerns. These findings pose challenges to initial teacher education (ITE) and child protection agencies but the SWiS programme has great potential to grow and act as an effective bridge between ITE, school leaders, teachers and MVCOT.

Liz Beddoe is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Auckland in New Zealand. Liz practiced social work for 14 years in health settings. Liz’s teaching and research interests include critical perspectives on social work education, supervision and professional identity. Liz has published articles in New Zealand and international journals addressing supervision and professional issues including the professional experiences of migrant social workers. She is Editor-in-chief of the open access journal Aotearoa New Zealand Social Work.

Liz has co-authored two books on supervision with Allyson Davys: ‘Best Practice in Professional Supervision: A Guide for the Helping Professions’ (2010, Jessica Kingsley Publishers) and ‘Challenges in professional supervision: Current themes and models for practice’ (2016, Jessica Kingsley Publishers). Liz has also co-edited ‘Supervision in Social Work: Contemporary Issues’ (2015, Routledge) with Jane Maidment. She has also co-edited ‘Promoting Health and Wellbeing in Social Work Education’ (Routledge, 2013) with Beth Crisp, ‘Social Work Practice for Promoting Health and Wellbeing: Critical Issues’ with Jane Maidment (Routledge, 2014) and ‘Social Policy for Social Work and Human Services in Aotearoa New Zealand: Diverse Perspectives’ with Jane Maidment (Canterbury University Press, 2016).

 

WHA ROOM – PM – Elaine Dyer & Geoff Bridgman

Jade Speaks Up: a resource for people working with children affected by violence

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Jade Speaks Up: a resource for people working with children affected by violence

When family violence call-outs by police neared 119,000 in 2016, and children were present in the majority of these homes, clearly we end up with traumatised children in our school classrooms.

Elaine Dyer, long-time activist for non-violence, has been coordinating exploration of this challenge by developing a resource “Jade Speaks Up”… an animated film and manual for teachers, social workers, therapists and parent educators.  This year 1320 children aged between 9-12 in 8 schools around Auckland and Bay of Plenty have been involved in an ACC funded pilot to test the effectiveness of this programme.

This workshop is an opportunity to see the 8 minute film and hear some of the results of the research and to explore ways that this might support work in the area of violence prevention for our children.

Check out the website http://www.violencefreecommunities.org/jade-speaks-up/   for more information

Presenters:

Elaine Dyer, former CEO of Violence Free Waitakere and current Project Leader for Jade Speaks Up

Geoff Bridgman, Principal researcher,  Lecturer and Academic Leader of Social Practice, UNITEC.

 

TAHI ROOM – PM – Tania Beekmans
Strength Cards Workshop

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This workshop is a hands on look at using strength based cards. Come willing to share a little of yourself as you learn about some of the different strength based resources available to aid in engagement, reflection, and identifying strengths you have and those you want to work on.

There will be resources available to order from Compass with a conference special of buy 3 items and get a $15 discount.

Tania Beekmans works at ATWC as their Special Projects Practice Development Coordinator. Prior to social work she trained in early childhood and then worked with children with severe and challenging behaviours in a primary school setting. Tania was employed at Family Start where she decided to train to become a social worker, she studied her undergrad at Unitec and completed a post grad diploma in professional supervision at University of Auckland. Tania has worked as a Family Start social worker, MASISS, SWiS and Family Start Practice Leader in various organisations. Tania currently does external supervision in her role at ATWC. Tania has been using strength based resources in her practice for many years and particularly enjoys using cards in group work.

Register to the Wise Up Conference 2017 Now

Lock in the lowest price for Wise Up 2017. Pre-register now and we’ll contact you with more details when it’s time to complete your registration.

Register your interest and we will contact you with the registration form.

Take a look at this video from our last WISE UP Conference.

Wise Up 2017 Conference Tickets

All prices are inclusive of GST

Early Bird

$316.25 inc. GST

Standard

$373.75 inc. GST

Partners/Sponsors

A huge thanks to all our amazing partners. We couldn’t have a conference without you!

Interested in becoming a sponsor?

If your company is interested in sponsoring WISE UP 2017 Conference this year, we’d love to hear from you. Send us a quick email and we’ll get right back to you with more information.

WISE UP 2017 VENUE

This year the WISE UP 2017 Conference will be held at the Pacific Events Centre, Manukau, Auckland. Here is all the information that you need to know about the venue and it's location and if you have any questions, please feel free to get in touch with us.

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Venue

Pacific Events Centre 770 Great South Rd Wiri, Manukau 2104 Auckland

Transport

Please make yourself familiar with the location venue and ensure that you have the necessary means of transport to ensure you arrive safely and on time to the Wise Up 2017 Conference.

Parking

Parking available free for registered delegates.

Additional Details

If you have any enquiries regarding the Wise Up 2017 Conference and need further assistance, please get in touch with Aroha Ruka and she will be happy to assist. Her contact details are: Phone: 09 276 3729 ext 9506 Email: wiseup@atwc.org.nz